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Art Supplies in Melbourne

Every individual is endowed by God with skills and talent that are unique from each other in many special ways. One of those that...

Aboriginal Scarves

Why All the Patterns? Silk Scarves and the Stories They Tell Aboriginal silk scarves have become popularised over the last few years. These scarves come in...

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Art Supplies in Melbourne

Every individual is endowed by God with skills and talent that are unique from each other in many special ways. One of those that...

Aboriginal Scarves

Why All the Patterns? Silk Scarves and the Stories They Tell Aboriginal silk scarves have become popularised over the last few years. These scarves come in...

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Art Supplies in Melbourne

Every individual is endowed by God with skills and talent that are unique from each other in many special ways. One of those that are very much appreciated is the ability to sketch or draw people or objects even without something as a point of reference. It usually takes a skilled hand and a keen eye to details using the imagination in order to create a masterpiece. Every renowned artist sees things differently, and before creating something extraordinary, a beautiful perspective is already in mind and is ready to be converted into reality using the needed art materials or supplies. If you are looking, art supplies in Melbourne are readily available for purchase, both for art experts and enthusiast. Stores are conveniently located in almost all county, and the best thing is, almost everything you are going to purchase is not only affordable but also are made of high-grade materials, making your masterpiece exceptional and extraordinary. Planning on doing a painting of nature or abstract made of multiple silhouette colours will never be the same again. Plus, the friendly and accommodating staff will assist you along the way while searching for that very critical item you are longing to explore with your creative hands.

Painting

  • Acrylic paint – Acrylic paint is a fast-drying paint made of pigment suspended in acrylic polymer emulsion. Acrylic paints are water-soluble but become water-resistant when dry.
  • Paintbrush – While natural-hair bristles (like the stiff hog bristle and soft sable) are commonly recommended for oil painting because they cope well with the heavy texture of the paint and maintain their shape even after many uses, brushes with natural hairs can be damaged by acrylic paint over time.
  • Acrylic paint extenders – Acrylics paints are water-based and cure through the evaporation of the water from the paint. Extenders also called “retarders,” slow the drying time of acrylic paint from just a few hours to up to a few days, depending on the ratio of the extender to paint.
  • Canvas – a strong, coarse unbleached cloth made from hemp, flax, cotton, or similar yarn, used to make items such as sails and tents and as a surface for oil painting.

Sculpture

There are basically seven mediums of sculpture, and these are the following: is a mineral or rock that is soft, often used for carving, and is processed for plaster powder. Archaeologists and the stone processing industry use the word differently from geologists.
  • Clay – is a finely-grained natural rock or soil material that combines one or more clay minerals with possible traces of quartz, metal oxides and organic matter. Geologic clay deposits are mostly composed of phyllosilicate minerals containing variable amounts of water trapped in the mineral structure.
  • Bronze – is an 80+% copper alloy and 90+% copper and tin alloy with often the addition of other metals, such as aluminium, manganese, nickel or zinc, and sometimes nonmetals or metalloids such as arsenic, phosphorus or silicon.
  • Ceramic – is a solid material comprising an inorganic compound of metal, non-metal or metalloid atoms primarily held in ionic and covalent bonds. Typical examples are earthenware, porcelain, and brick.
  • Terracotta – terra cotta or terra-cotta, a type of earthenware, is a clay-based unglazed or glazed ceramic, where the fired body is porous.
  • Alabaster – is a mineral or rock that is soft, often used for carving, and is processed for plaster powder. Archaeologists and the stone processing industry use the word differently from geologists.
  • Soapstone – a soft, metamorphic rock consisting largely of talc.
  • Weathering steel – often referred to by the generalised trademark COR-TEN steel and sometimes written without the hyphen as corten steel, is a group of steel alloys which were developed to eliminate the need for painting, and form a stable rust-like appearance after several years exposure to weather.

Aboriginal Scarves

Why All the Patterns?

Silk Scarves and the Stories They Tell

Aboriginal silk scarves have become popularised over the last few years. These scarves come in two distinct styles: the most well-known being bright and colourful with intricate designs. The patterns usually demonstrate the dot paint style historically linked with Aboriginal art throughout the millennia. What many patrons don’t realise is that these scarves are mimicking a story-telling art. Dot painting was used by Aboriginal peoples to communicate stories while disguising the meaning to outsiders. See here to purchase an Aboriginal scarf online.

Historical Context

Traditionally, patterns denoting sacred meaning were used in rituals and ceremonies within Aboriginal cultures and were kept secret from outsiders. They were drawn into the soil and painted on bodies. The soil would be swept clean and bodies washed after the ceremonies: patterns were kept sacred. In the 1970s a Western instructor of Aboriginal children noticed that when stories were told, designs were also drawn in the sand by the storyteller. The instructor encouraged these patterns to be painted onto a mural, and the movement escalated from there. Aboriginal artists began painting to create. They developed the dot painting style seen printed on many scarves today to disguise the meaning of sacred patterns they included in their work. Other artists drew inspiration from their ancestors’ cave drawings and story-telling art: using dyed silks and brushes they hand-paint these designs onto the scarves.

Patterns and Colours Found Today

Aboriginal scarves are traditionally made of silk. They are usually hand-dyed and for the most part, are found in the two distinct styles mentioned above. The first, representative of dot painting, is traditionally very bright. These scarves are dyed a vibrant solid colour which is used as a base to anchor the bolder patterns painted or printed on top. In this genre, minutely detailed patterns are painted onto the silk primarily using different sized dots in a multitude of colours. These are then defined and organised with long brush strokes in lines and circles. In contrast, the second primary style found in Aboriginal scarves today utilizes a more neutral and muted palette. These scarves are dyed in earth tones, artists typically hand-dye them with a variety of lighter and darker tones in the same colour family. Muted browns, tans, and darker greens are commonly found. Artists then take traditional Aboriginal drawing styles and paint or print them, typically in black, on top of the fabric. Typical patterns include animals, stick drawings with exaggerated endpoints, and detailed line drawings.

Scarves and the Retail Industry

Aboriginal artists today create unique designs derived from and inspired by ancient Aboriginal ceremonial patterns and drawings used in storytelling. Artist collectives have formed all over the country where artists live, work, and sell their creations. The patterns from the original artistic movement are being replicated and recreated in popular culture also: sold by online retailers and found in many storefronts worldwide.  

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