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Aboriginal Scarves

Why All the Patterns? Silk Scarves and the Stories They Tell Aboriginal silk scarves have become popularised over the last few years. These scarves come in...

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Aboriginal Scarves

Why All the Patterns? Silk Scarves and the Stories They Tell Aboriginal silk scarves have become popularised over the last few years. These scarves come in...
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7 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT NEW ZEALAND BEFORE YOU ARRIVE

Due to the less ozone and pollution to block the sun’s harmful UV rays, the exposure to sun rays is far higher in...

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Aboriginal Scarves

Why All the Patterns?

Silk Scarves and the Stories They Tell

Aboriginal silk scarves have become popularised over the last few years. These scarves come in two distinct styles: the most well-known being bright and colourful with intricate designs. The patterns usually demonstrate the dot paint style historically linked with Aboriginal art throughout the millennia. What many patrons don’t realise is that these scarves are mimicking a story-telling art. Dot painting was used by Aboriginal peoples to communicate stories while disguising the meaning to outsiders. See here to purchase an Aboriginal scarf online.

Historical Context

Traditionally, patterns denoting sacred meaning were used in rituals and ceremonies within Aboriginal cultures and were kept secret from outsiders. They were drawn into the soil and painted on bodies. The soil would be swept clean and bodies washed after the ceremonies: patterns were kept sacred. In the 1970s a Western instructor of Aboriginal children noticed that when stories were told, designs were also drawn in the sand by the storyteller. The instructor encouraged these patterns to be painted onto a mural, and the movement escalated from there. Aboriginal artists began painting to create. They developed the dot painting style seen printed on many scarves today to disguise the meaning of sacred patterns they included in their work. Other artists drew inspiration from their ancestors’ cave drawings and story-telling art: using dyed silks and brushes they hand-paint these designs onto the scarves.

Patterns and Colours Found Today

Aboriginal scarves are traditionally made of silk. They are usually hand-dyed and for the most part, are found in the two distinct styles mentioned above. The first, representative of dot painting, is traditionally very bright. These scarves are dyed a vibrant solid colour which is used as a base to anchor the bolder patterns painted or printed on top. In this genre, minutely detailed patterns are painted onto the silk primarily using different sized dots in a multitude of colours. These are then defined and organised with long brush strokes in lines and circles. In contrast, the second primary style found in Aboriginal scarves today utilizes a more neutral and muted palette. These scarves are dyed in earth tones, artists typically hand-dye them with a variety of lighter and darker tones in the same colour family. Muted browns, tans, and darker greens are commonly found. Artists then take traditional Aboriginal drawing styles and paint or print them, typically in black, on top of the fabric. Typical patterns include animals, stick drawings with exaggerated endpoints, and detailed line drawings.

Scarves and the Retail Industry

Aboriginal artists today create unique designs derived from and inspired by ancient Aboriginal ceremonial patterns and drawings used in storytelling. Artist collectives have formed all over the country where artists live, work, and sell their creations. The patterns from the original artistic movement are being replicated and recreated in popular culture also: sold by online retailers and found in many storefronts worldwide.  

7 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT NEW ZEALAND BEFORE YOU ARRIVE

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  1. Due to the less ozone and pollution to block the sun’s harmful UV rays, the exposure to sun rays is far higher in New Zealand than in the most other countries and New Zealand has one of the world’s highest rates of skin cancer. So, before you land in that country you better put on some sunscreen and wear on a hat.
  1. New Zealand has unimaginably strict biosecurity laws to guarantee obtrusive species do not enter their lands that could impact and affect the nation’s farming and indigenous habitats. You should announce any food, plants or animal products on landing in customs, and any outdoors outfit, sloppy boots, golf clubs or bikes which may be carrying around outsider species. In case you don’t know, it’s best to pronounce it as substantially as fines can be forced for neglecting to do as so. Ensure you clean your shoes, boots or any other gear before you go to New Zealand.
  1. It isn’t common or necessary to tip while you are in New Zealand, but you can however, for really excellent service tip if you like. The sum is optional and is generally 10% of the entire amount being paid for the service. On national holidays it is standard for eateries and bistros to charge an extra administration expense of around 10-15%. So, lookout for whether you are already being charged for the services.
  1. New Zealand is known for having four seasons in a single day. The temperature in the North and South Islands can significantly vary or change within a few hours, and relying upon what season you go, it can get extremely icy. Bring easygoing garments that you can layer. Bring great shoes as there is a considerable measure of strolling, climbing, and outdoor activities, and bring a rain coat. The rain visits particularly near South Island icy masses and Fiordland National Park.
  1. New Zealand’s a very low populated nation. Topographically it’s nearby in size to the UK, yet its populace is just 4.47 million. But, an interesting fact is that sheep outnumber individuals. There are around six sheep for each human in New Zealand. it’s one of the most shocking proportions on the planet. So, you better get used to seeing sheeps all around you!eight_col_nz_population
  1. Get ready for some amazing and frequent coffee breaks. You can find coffee machines (generally espresso) at all small and big restaurants, gas stations, stores and any place nearby to your surprise would possibly have a coffee making machine with wonderful cups in which you can drink.
  1. If you love camping then New Zealand is just the place for you as you can basically camp on any conservation land. There are no restrictions to where you can camp. So pack a few tents if you are deciding to fly to Zealand.

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